@joehewitt agrees with me. “Browser makers need to go nuts with non-standard APIs and let the W3C standardize later”

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These tweets were posted on Thursday, April 29, just hours after I published my blog post. We are in total agreement.

@twoism says: i felt the same way when i started iphone dev. it was amazing to have everything work the way the docs said it would

5 comments

  1. I really have to disagree here. Let them go nuts with apps or non-Web software on various platforms, but keep the Web as a standardized, unifying glue. Web developers have already suffered for years with Microsoft’s attempts to privatize the Web via Internet Explorer, and it has set the development of the Web back by years due to everyone having to devote extra resources to coding cross-browser compatibility.I find it pretty ironic that as you post this (and your other post), your own co-founder, Garry, is writing about how much he hates coding/testing for IE6/7/etc. Or that your very own service, Posterous, is entirely Web based and does benefit from Web standards.Keep the Web free and standardized, even at the cost of some advanced functionality. That can always be bought at a premium by those who require it, as in paid apps for your iPhone, etc. Simple as that.

  2. Alex: If you think the web should be free and standardized, that’s fine. But then developers and users WILL move to native apps more and more (like I said above). I’m offering a possible solution for the web platform to innovate faster and stay alive.Otherwise, the web will go back to what it once was (and what I think is the only thing it does well): to be the lowest common denominator to view flat, static content. For anything richer than, developers should and will choose to create native apps.It’s really not fair to compare my blog post to Garry’s. We aren’t the same person, we are not one mind. Internally we have made decisions about the level to which we want to support IE6 and what issues should and shouldn’t be resolved. That doesn’t contradict this post at all. We as developers choose which browsers to support based on their capabilities, user base, and our resources.wrt your comment about me coding: yes, I do code. Less now. But I was CS at Stanford, spent 6 years coding C, C++ at Apple. I coded the first version of Posterous (Ruby on Rails, Java) and I made our iPhone app.Through all that, it’s super clear to me that I enjoy web development the least. Clearly I love Posterous and this product is my baby, but developing for the iPhone showed me how weak the web really is.And to your comment about Posterous being entirely web: well, see that’s where you are flat out wrong. Posterous was post by email before the name "posterous" even existed. I hated the web tools that I had to use for posting content, so I decided to build an email based gateway. I want to use richer tools to post, and the web is for dumb consumption. (although now we email posts to subscribers, so you don’t even need the web to consume).The concept behind posterous is incredibly consistent with this blog post: I hate web software.

  3. OK, Sachin, thanks for clarifying a few things. BTW, I merely said that it was ironic that Garry was writing those posts at the same time, not meaning to be unfair.To me, Email is simply part of the Web standards, you may have a different definition, which is fine. BTW, there have been huge issues with SMTP especially which I have never understood why weren’t fixed. TO THIS DAY, I can forge you as the sender, which is crazy…everyone complains about SPAM (80%+ of all Email sent), even passed a law against it, but no one could be bothered to fix the protocol…As to the larger issue, here is what I just wrote as a comment on Chris Wilson’s (MSFT IE dev) new post "The IE plateau – a history lesson":"Yeah, yeah, just keep telling yourself that… the rest of the world knows that Microsoft’s intentions toward the Web have for the most part been less than honorable.IE6 has been the bane of Web builders’ existences for nearly a decade, and has cost the sane advancement of the Web years in terms of people having to waste time and resources on cross-browser compatibility.Just the way Microsoft wanted it, I suspect…Thanks for nothing."There must be something in the air that all of these posts are appearing today on the same day…http://cwilso.com/2010/04/30/the-ie-plateau-a-history-lesson/#comment-527

  4. I disagree. The Web doesn’t suck. But you are right. It is time for innovation. The flat 2D Internet experience is on the verge of changing. The introduction of online multi-player real time video gaming online will radically shift the paradigm of online experience. I started a new company, Vizitnow3D, to introduce the combined processes of social media, 3D and video game technology within a navigable, interactive 3D environment accessible via Web browser and mobile phone. We created a prototype and are currently showing it to interested investors and clients.Imaging a 3D airport accessible online. Instead of travelers (500 million visited the top 15 U.S. airports last year) going online to a variety of search options to get airline tickets, car rentals and hotels, they simply go to the airport Web site. No one does because airports have no Internet innovation in their industry. But wouldn’t that make it easy for travelers? And they could explore the airport, check out the in-airport merchants, plan itineraries for layovers, purchase products that they can pick up when they arrive, and so much more!Imagine walking through the terminal to find your gate and being able to click on the advertising hanging on the wall … to trigger a 3D window with real time information that’s controlled by that advertiser!Imagine being able to click on a travel destination that catches your eye in the 3D airport and being whisked to that 3D environment! The Internet is about to change dramatically. So, I agree with your sentiment, when you say the Web sucks, but I would rather think of it as the Web needs to innovate. And it is. Want to see a demo? Email me (amikegreen2@yahoo.com).

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